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Articles about Europe:

The Origin of New Year’s Day

Jan 2, 2014 | in Europe, News, slider

The Origin of New Year’s Day

New Year’s Day hasn’t always been observed on January 1st. In fact, the early Roman calendar designated March 1st as the start of the new year. Instead of twelve months, the Roman calendar had just ten months, beginning in March. Therefore, September through December in the Roman calendar would have been the seventh through the tenth months. This is reflected in the naming of the months with septem being Latin for seven, octo for eight, novem for nine, and decem for ten. It wasn’t until 153 BC, when the second king of Rome added January...

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Boxing Day

Dec 26, 2013 | in Europe, Featured Articles, News

Boxing Day

Boxing Day is celebrated in many countries the day after Christmas. It’s not, as the name might suggest, a holiday that involves pugilistic competition. In fact, the exact origin of term Boxing Day is unknown. However, it likely developed in in one of two ways, or even a combination of both. The first involved English nobility. In Great Britain, during the Middle Ages, servants were required to work on Christmas Day, and therefore were allowed to take off the following day. It was a tradition at the time that employers would give their...

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The Origin of Christmas

Dec 24, 2013 | in Europe, Featured Articles, News, North America

The Origin of Christmas

Although some may believe that Christmas has its origin in Christianity, that assumption would be false. As it turns out, the origin of Christmas pre-dates Christianity and began as a pagan celebration. In fact, December 25th is a date on which a number of pagan gods were supposedly born and there were, therefore, a number of pagan celebrations held on that date. One festival held on December 25th recognized a heroic supernatural figure that visits an evergreen tree and leaves gifts on December 25th. In addition, in ancient Babylon, December...

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KL Gates

Dec 6, 2013 | in Asia, Europe, Featured Articles, News, North America, Spotlight

KL Gates

One of the attorneys that Thornhill Capital has had the pleasure of working with over the past decade has been Clay Parker from KL Gates. Clay is a securities partner out of the firm’s Miami office. I’ve worked with Clay on a number of transactions in China, Europe, and North America. Even though our offices are two hours apart by car, there was a time when we’d constantly run into each other in China more than the US. I use that to illustrate that Clay is a hands on attorney who doesn’t just sit at his desk and give you advice. In my...

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Negotiating in Russia

Nov 19, 2013 | in Europe, Featured Articles, News

Negotiating in Russia

My partner Dave Dodge and I have negotiated transactions in a great many countries. In those negotiations we’ve noticed that all foreign cultures have a particular negotiating style which sets them apart from negotiators in other countries. This is especially true in Russia where it seems that just about everything requires some degree of negotiation. Below are some of most common characteristics of the Russian negotiating process. Characteristics of Russian Negotiations: Negotiations can be a team sport. Russians take negotiations very...

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The Origin of Halloween

Oct 31, 2013 | in Europe, Featured Articles, News

The Origin of Halloween

Halloween had its origins in Europe. The celebration, and even the name itself, have evolved over time. The word “Halloween” is actually derived from the Scottish term All Hallows Eve, which is the evening before All Hallows Day, or All Saints Day in the Christian religion. Hallowed, in Old English, means holy or sanctified. In Scots, the word eve eventually contracted to een. And, over time, All Hallows Eve came to be called Halloween. All Hallows Eve falls on October 31st, the day before All Saints day. The Church had a tradition during...

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European Fast Food

Oct 22, 2013 | in Europe, Featured Articles, News

European Fast Food

It probably comes as no surprise that European’s have different eating and cooking habits than Americans. Stereotypically, Americans generally have a mental picture of Europeans taking long lunches capped with a cup of espresso. They feel that meals in Europe are savored and enjoyed without the time pressure experienced by most Westerners. That’s true to a great extent, as most Europeans tend to cook at home. That’s why a visit to a European supermarket will show only a small frozen ready-made food section in comparison to an American...

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What’s in a Name?

Oct 15, 2013 | in Europe, Featured Articles, News, North America

What’s in a Name?

Not that long ago, I was in London and buying a coffee at a Starbucks. I still can’t quite get around to choosing tea over coffee. But as I was paying for my coffee in British pounds, I wondered why the British, and some other countries, use the word pound for their currency? And why do we, for that matter, use the word dollar? Below is an explanation of how these names came about. British pound – the pound is a unit of currency in some nations, such as Great Britain, where the term originated in the late fourteenth century. This word is...

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Oktoberfest

Oct 1, 2013 | in Europe, Featured Articles, News

Oktoberfest

Oktoberfest is the world’s largest fair. It’s a 16 day festival held in Munich, Germany that runs from late September to the first Sunday in October. During this time more than 6.2 million people will attend this festival and consume over 7.5 million liters of beer. Oktoberfest dates back to October 12, 1810 when Bavarian Crown Prince Ludwig married Princess Therese von Sachsen-Hildburghausen. In celebration of this marriage the Bavarian royalty invited all the citizens of Munich to attend a celebration held in the fields in front of the...

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The First Stock Exchange

Aug 27, 2013 | in Europe, Featured Articles, News

The First Stock Exchange

A short time ago I was speaking with a good friend of mine, Larry Isen. Larry and I have worked on projects together for quite some time and he’s always been a fountain of knowledge on a wide variety of securities issues. Last week we were speaking about my blog on the Origin of Wall Street when Larry reminded me of something he sent me earlier entitled Managing the Fear Factor. I re-read it and asked Larry if I could publish it since his article was a well-written piece and also tied in with my earlier blog. Larry’s short article...

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